Art 1600 | Design Foundations I
Class-by-Class Notes

Spring  ‘20


Monday-Wednesday Class Periods
Week #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
break
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
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Mon

1

MLK

4

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14

Sp Br

16

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28

Mon

Wedn

2

3

5

7

9

11

13

15

Sp Br

17

19

21

23

25

27

29

Wedn

Tuesday-Thursday Class Periods
Week #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
break
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Week #

Tues

1

3

5

7

9

11

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15

Sp Br

17

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21

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24

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28

Tues

Thurs

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

Sp Br

18

20

22

Chic

25

27

29

Thurs

 
 
 
 
4th Wk
Exams
 
 
 
MidTerm
Exams
 
 
 
 
12th Wk
Exams
 
 
 
 

 

 

 


Project Descriptions


Daily Class Schedule
Class Topics and Activities for Today's Class

Assignments for Today
• readings • supplies • due dates

Class 1

Fall: Monday, August 19 @ 1 p.m.

Spring:
Monday
, January 14 @ 10 a.m.
Tuesday, January15 @ 1 p.m.

Class is in room Art 201
(Which is upstairs in the art building, closest to the Benson Aud.)

Announcements:

Chicago Trip signups are now open.
___________________________________________________________

Introduction to course.
Discussion of course supplies and sources.
eBook option or Rent Print Book for the semester

Canvas Page for this Course   
First Assignment: QD/Personal Mark
Assign: Self-Intro Questionaire — Canvas
Assign: Reading (text to p. 11)
Assign: Canvas Quiz: Class2 - Chapter 01a (to pg 13)

Quicky Design Elements Intro (video)

Logo Design Theory, Part 1: Symbols, Metaphors And The Power Of Intuition - Smashing Magazine | Pt2 Nature | Pt3 Geometry

Sign up for the Spring Art & Design Chicago Trip

Come as you are.

In class we'll go over the course syllabus including text, supplies and course guidelines which are online.

You're welcome to look over any of these before class.

 

Class 2

[top]

Announcements:

Anthony Howe Kinetic Wind Sculptures
Relies on 3d modeling of forms and motion, sculptural/metal-working skills, and an awareness of the physics of mechanics, wind and weather.
Facebook Page |   Anthony Howe Site VideoPortfolioFullVideoCompilation(36min)

eBook option or Rent Print Book for the semester
Have you completed the online Canvas Self-Intro questions?
Have you completed your first online Canvas Quiz?
Both close soon.

— Present & Review Personal Marks.
— Concept statements. What are you going for?
How do express you, through a simple mark? What can a graphic say?
— How did you start? What thoughts or tactics got you rolling?
— 30 sketches — lline-, texture-, shape-dominated
— How did you decide which one to develop and present?
— How did your intent, or concept show up in the design?

— Crit Designs:
Which solutions surprised you?
Which tell you the most about the designer?
Which design are bold and eye catching? Why so? What traits cause that effect?

Formal Issues

Dominating Forms — What does it mean for a design to be "dominated" by line, or by shape or by texture?
Line Dominance — Which designs use line prominently? What is line able to express?
Shape Dominance — Which design use shape prominently? What can shape say?
Texture Dominance — Which solutions use active texture?
What can texture evoke?
Form Choices and Expressive Character — How do the line-based designs differ in character from the shape- and texture-based designs?
Harmony — Which designs are most "resolved" -- they have formal "self-consistency" ; coherent internal relationships; they use repeated traits or forms?
Balance — radial, symmetrical, assymetrical, inner-vs-outer, positive-negative are each balance options and issues. Which of these designs use balance in an interesting way?
Movement —  Which designs feel still, static and solid?
Which feel fluid or dynamic?
Positive vs. Negative Shape — which design makes active use of negative spaces?
Do any designs feel crowded? ... feel sparse?
Which balance positive and negative space well?
What difference does that balance make?

Revised Design:
-- Consider the crit comments about your design, or designs with similariities to yours.
-- What refinements, changes, additions or deletions would most improve the power or clarity of your design?
-- If assigned, create one more revision to your design. A sharp sketch will be fine.


Complete Self-crit and documentary photos*.       
Crit/Grade sheet available in class, or HERE.

*Documentary Photos of your design:
— Use the in-class cameras
— Take a pic of both you (your face) and your design... fairly close-up.
— A nicely framed, illuminated, sharp-focused image of your design
— A shot of the back -- with your concept statement and label.
— Shoot pages of your sketchbook with sketches and notes on this design.
__ If you did an in-class revised design, shoot it side-by-side with your presented design.

— Concept Statement Development: how do you start a design?
(2DC02 ConceptA.ppt)

Content Concept
Response Concept
Impact Concept
Graphic Concept

Form vs. Content: message vs the visual features that express it.

Functionalism... form follows function;
design expresses purpose;
solutions solve problems.
Functionalism asserts that design is an intentional pursuit of forms that solve some known, identified goal.
Every design choice, reflects known priorities or purpose.
again...
Form Follows Function

In his 1896 article,
The Tall Office Building Artistically Considered,”
American architect Louis Sullivan wrote:

“It is the pervading law of all things organic and inorganic, of all things physical and metaphysical, of all things human and all things superhuman, of all true manifestations of the head, of the heart, of the soul, that the life is recognizable in its expression, that form ever follows function. This is the law.” (see SmashingPumpkin article)

Sign up for the Spring Art & Design Chicago Trip

— Intro & Discuss Name Plate project

Before Class Today:

1) Have your basic supplies purchased.

2) Complete the online self-intro questions after reading the course syllabus
(Here is the syllabus — the online ontent presented and discussed during Class 1).

3) Personal Mark (6" black, white, +1Color) *** Completed ***

4) Read: Design Basics  (p. 4-13) 
eBook option or Rent Print Book for the semester

5) Online Canvas Quiz: Class 2 - Chapter 01a (to pg 13)

Class 3

[top]

Announcements:

 

OnC: Doodling, Thinking, Learning | YouTube
Do you doodle? When?
Is doodling a distraction... a waste of time... a sign of inattention?
What's different when you do doodle? ...or when you can't?
"...doodlers remember 29% more than non-doodlers..."

Presidential Doodles | Google's Doodles | All the Presidents' Doodles | Keep the Brain on Task |

“I'm also a pretty good doodler. ... folks don’t know that about me.”
                                                                              — Barack Obama

"It is well established that much of our creative expression is birthed in the unconscious mind. To use creative expression and solutions in your everyday life, it is necessary to dip into the unconscious at will. Doodling is one way of doing this....
Doodling allows the unconscious to render in symbolic expression..
Doodling essentially allows our intuitive feelings to express themselves in pictorial symbolic form...
When doodling just allow your hands to follow your impulse...
Those who seek to nurture the creative process need various ways to tap the unconscious mind. Doodling is a simple easy technique that can be practiced daily. from EnchantedMind.com

"..doodling doesn't detract from concentration; it can help by diminishing the need to resort to daydreams" — Alix Spiegel/NPR

Info-Doodling for the Productive Workplace
Sunni Brown/Doodlers Unite! TedTalk - A new defintion: Doodle: "to make spontaneous marks to help yourself think"

Take the 30-day doodling challenge.
___________________________________________________

NamePlate concept development
Fresh Questions?
What are the goals? ...limitations?
Source of ideas? ...first concept? ...primary motive/goal?
Explore your concept's priorities.

Creative Process pt1: ( 2DC03 ProblemSolvingProc.pptx)
Accept, Analyze, Define, * Ideate, Select, Implement, Evaluate, Let Go

Review Nameplate sketches/concepts.
Photodocument your sketches (with your initials visible in every pic.)

Sign up for the Spring Art & Design Chicago Trip

Read: Design Basics (p. 14-26)

Online Canvas Quiz: Class3 - Quiz Chapter 01b
(covering chapter 1, emphasizing pp 14ff )

• Complete initial sketches for Nameplate:
Have at least 30 sketches exploring at least 3 distinctly different nameplate concepts

Class 4

[top]

Announcements:

OnC: 7 Habits of Highly Creative People

Between now an next Class, contribute to the Canvas discussion on: 20 Things only a highly creative person would understand.

_______________________________

Creative Process pt2: ( 2DC03 ProblemSolvingProc.pptx)
Accept, Analyze, Define, * Ideate, Select, Implement, Evaluate, Let Go

Explore your design's implementation steps/stages/tasks.

Describe what steps, materials and tools it will take to complete your design.

Discuss final implementation issues with Nameplate.
What materials haven't you found? ...tools? Any "how do I do this?" questions?

__ Present/Crit Nameplate concepts
__ Explore concept statement types — what might you aim for?
__ Photodocument your sketches. (include name/label)

NamePlates:

What's left to figure out?
Is your priority concept clear and unambiguous? What are you aiming for?
Missing supplies? Missing tools? Missing ideas? ....time?

NamePlate Concept Presentation Sketches:

Do your sketches, notes, dimensions, views and swatches successfully represent your completed design? Can your peers envision what your design will actually be?
What is needed to better match your priority concept?
What traits might distract or undermine the impact of your design?
*** Take photos of your concept presentation sketches with class cameras.

Watch for and Participate in your required Symposium Events
• Check this list of Current Symposium Events •

Sign up for the Spring Art & Design Chicago Trip

 

Due: Descriptive sketch/presentation of your Nameplate concept.
--- Goal: a self-explanatory presentation complete and specific enough that the viewer can understand and envision your solution without you having to explain it.
— Explain your concept, design, materials and construction through this sketch and notes.
— Include any descriptive notes, labels, swatches or alternate views of your nameplate. 
— Include your concept statement (see Concept Summary). Priority concept: what do you most want this design/solution to do or be?
— Be ready to tell us briefly (60sec) about the essence of your concept and solution.
--- size: Sketchbook spread or large paper.
(max size: one large sketchpad spread)

Read: Design Basics (p. 26-41)

Online Canvas Quiz: Class 4 - Quiz Chapter 2a


Class 5

[top]

Announcements:

OnC: So is this you? 20 traits of creative people

Nameplates

Present & Review Nameplates

__ Written Crit of Nameplates
__ Photodocument your Nameplate.

For good shots:
set up a clean, one-color background and...
... good lighting -- ideally soft, white, @ 45 deg angle.
Shoot several shots to get all relevant views.
Shoot closeup details of any particularly interesting features.
Fill the frame!
Be sure you're focused, not blurry.

Critique of Critique: ( 2DC05 Critique Intro.ppt )

What's the point?
Why are critiques important to a designer's process?
What kinds of crits are there? Formal Descriptiive, Analytic, Response, lnterpretation...
What questions might I ask?
What is ineffective or destructive during a crit?
What kind of feedback is helpful and appropriate?
What sorts of insight is a critique aiming for?

Critiquing Critics: Why might we love our harshest critics? Maybe.

Nameplates Past: 2DC02 Name Plate Project Samples

Assign Order-Disorder Series 1

Gestalt Ordering Principles: Design Principles: Visual Perception And The Principles Of Gestalt - Smashing Magazine

“The whole is other than the sum of the parts.” — Kurt Koffka SmashingMag

Nameplate Project is due at the beginning of class.

— Have your nameplate ready to set up when class starts.
(if it unfolds or assembles or hangs or whatever, leave it "in the can" until we officially start. Be ready to set it up in only 60 seconds.)

— ALSO BRING your Nameplate sketches and concept statement notes
(you can keep them in your sketch pad)

Participate in the online Canvas discussion on: 20 Things (the article/list)
By class, be sure you have told us how you fit into a couple of items on the list.
By next class, be sure you have responded to at least two other folks' comments.
--- Can you relate to what they describe?
--- Have you found ways to benefit from their trait?

Read: Design Basics (p. 42-53)

Online Canvas Quiz: Quiz Chapter 1 & 2

 

Class 6

[top]

OnC: 20 traits of creative people

OnC: Which of these to you do? 10 Productivity Hacks for Creatives

Henry Moore: source to form
BBC "Best Sculptor" Sources & Studio (6m) | [maquettes @ 1.30ff]
Sculptures (2.20) | Moore in America ( | London Exhibit Opening(2m) | Art of Moore (8parts) |
Muses, Genius and Daemons |

Creative Process: Incubation
Inspiration, Source, Muses & non-control. ( 2DC06 Incubation-Source.ppt )

Research on Incubation & Taking Breaks:
Full Switch Off - take REAL breaks; chat face-to-face; don't surf
Take Breaks Early and Often
Get OUT -- of the office, building, studio.
...sleep better when you get your breaks during the day.

Crit/Discuss Series 1 beginning.

Lect: Unity, Similarity, Variety, Harmony
( PPT: 2DC06 Unity-Order-VarietyPt1.ppt )

Watch for and Participate in your required Symposium Events
• Check this list of Current Symposium Events •

Read: Design Basics (Chapter 3 p. 54-68)

Online Canvas Quiz: Quiz Chapter 3

Participate in the online Canvas discussion on: 20 Things only a highly creative person would understand. (the article/list)
By the prior class, you told us how you fit into a couple of items on the list.
By this class, be sure you have responded to at least two other folks' comments.
--- Can you relate to what they describe?
--- Have you found ways to benefit from their trait?

Order-Disorder Series: Series 1 — 1st, and last design completed for crit/discussion.

Class 7

[top]

OnC: How often is this you? 10 creative traits

OnC: What's your pattern? Consider the creativity and productivity habits of some of history's great contributors in this infographic poster.
[ 2DC07 Creative Lifestyle.pptx ]

M. C. Escher — geometric pattern, tiled fields, symmetry, order, figure-ground... visual mathematics.
Illusions and Order (BBC/4m)* | Images and Patterns (11m) |Documentary/Bio (1hr)
Escher Tesselation Gallery | Hyperbolic Tesselations | Tilings |
Tesselation | Tesselation | Tesselation Structure | "Ascending & Descending" 3D Model
Waterfall simplified model/video | Waterfall CGI demo | 3d Illusions

     

Eschers Metamorphosis series* are not so much about order-to-disorder, as one-order-to-another-order.

Design Principles: Space And The Figure Ground Relationship - Smashing Magazine

[ Incubation - DC06 Incubation-Source.ppt )
Unity, Similarity, Variety, Harmony - PPT: 2DC06 Unity-Order-VarietyPt1.ppt ]

Or try out Canadian artist Robert Gonsalves.
Or these illusionist images.

_______________________________________

Discuss/Crit Order Disorder Series 1
design 1: highly ordered? visually interesting (varied structure)?
design 5: thoroughly random?
designs 1-5: gradual transition? consistent "steps" of increasing disorder? where is biggest "jump"? where is "flattest" change?
design 4: is design 1 still apparent?

Work on Series 1, stages 2/3/4

_______________________________________

MyFavs Artist/Designer Search:
Use the MyFavs Template to create a shared gallery of artist/designers that you admire. Follow the instructions in the template to create your own MyFavs document and link it to OurFavs.

For next class: Post imagery from one favorite Artist/Designer to your MyFav document, and make sure your document is linked in OurFavs Doc.
In the formal analysis section, do your best to describe unifying traits and variety/diversity traits. We're just getting started on this, so observe and describe traits as best you can for now.

Order-Disorder Series: Series 1 — All 5 stages completed for crit/discussion; mount designs to backing board (11x28).

Have materials on hand to continue working on Series1*

Read: Design Basics(Chapter 3 p. 54-69; review chs. 1 & 2)

Read and look over Chapter 11 of the course text, on Motion. (p. 228-240)

Online Canvas Quiz: Quiz Chapter 3, 2, & 1

 

 

Class 8

[top]

OnC:Janet Echelman: Taking imagination seriously
One thing leads to another, or...
How do circumstances become possibilities?

Artist's Site | EchelmanWikiP | Facebook |

Spring '20 - Spring Sing Art Fair, Saturday April 11, 10am-2pm
Orientation Session TBA
Information and Signup Link
____________________________________________________

Crit Order-Disorder Series 1

Chapter 2: Unity

Harmony, Uniformity, Similarity, Variety, Gestalt, Proximity, Repetition, Continuation. (Mondrian, Picasso, etc.)
( PPt: 2DC07 Unity-Order-VarietyPt2.ppt )

Design Analysis: Describing Form within Order
Catalina Estrada's Zune graphics | Estrada's Site | (design analyses)

Watch for and Participate in your required Symposium Events
• Check this list of Current Symposium Events •

Order-Disorder Series: Series 1
Turn in all stages complete.
Take photos
Complete Crit

Due: Post imagery from one favorite Artist/Designer to your MyFav document, and make sure your document is linked in OurFavs Doc.
In the formal analysis section, do your best to describe unifying traits and variety/diversity traits. We're just getting started on this, so observe and describe traits as best you can for now.

Read: Design Basics (Chapter 4, p. 68-85)

Online Canvas Quiz: Class 8 - Quiz Chapter 4

 

 

Class 9

[top]

TedTalk on Dutch artist Theo Jansen's walking sculptures (8.13)
broad explanation of the features and benefits of his Stromby designs that "re invent the wheel."
YouTube Strombies intro*** |
Strandbeast video/music* |
Adam Savage re StrandBeest Model Kits | Pedal-Powered
Other Odd Motions/Mechanics: How Round is Your Circle? | Mechanical Principles/Ralph Steiner | Mechanical Greeting Cards | Odd-Mechanics/Motions

Discuss/explore ch11: Motion, Graphic Dynamism, Fluidity & Repetition
[ ch. 11 ] [ ppt: Bk-Des BasicsCh11Motion ]

Gehry/Balboa Analysis
[ ppt: 2DDA03 Gehry Balboa / 2DC07 Design Analysis 05-Gehry]

Introduce: Series 2 — Static-Relaxed-Dynamic
assign concept sketches

___________________________

Read: Design Basics Chapter 4; review Chs. 2 & 3
Read Ch. 11 on Motion/Movement (dynamism)

Online Canvas Quiz: Class 9 - Quiz Chapters 4, 2 & 3

FIND, SCAN & DISCUSS: Unity-Variety Analysis 1:

A) Successful DesignA — Find a design that exhibits strong, successful unity… a design that YOU like.
B) Unsuccessful DesignB —Find a design that is clearly un-unified… a design that YOU don’t think is very good.
C) Write/Email: describe what makes designA work well, and then...
describe what makes designB look weak.
— What helps unify this design?
— What forms introduce contrast, variety and imbalance?
Email to : GClayton@harding.edu subject: 2D01 by 9:00 on day of class.
D) Include images: Create JPG images of A & B and send as attachments. (150kb max)

________________________________

Class 10

[top]

OnC: What would you add to this list?
40 Things to Do
Why do such things help?
Which have you tried?
What works for you?

Spring '20 - Spring Sing Art Fair, Saturday April 11, 10am-2pm
Orientation Session TBA
Information and Signup Link

Picasso Glass Paintings — the permanent and the passing
Glass Paintings I (2.35m) | Paintings II (2.20m ) | Picasso Bull III |
Is art supposed to last?

Harmony, Uniformity, Similarity, Variety, Gestalt, Proximity, Repetition, Continuation. (Mondrian, Picasso, etc.)
( PPt: 2DC07 Unity-Order-VarietyPt2.ppt )

Form vs Subject vs Content

Crit Series 2: Static, Relaxed, Dynamic 
(see notes to right)
— how are forms expressing your three content-themes?
— do you have dominating elements to unify your designs?
— how will you build emphasis? ...and relief?

Design Principles: Connecting And Separating Elements Through Contrast And Similarity - Smashing Magazine

"Similarity and contrast, connection and separation, grouped and ungrouped are all ways to describe the varying sameness and difference between elements." - Smashing Mag

Watch for and Participate in your required Symposium Events
• Check this list of Current Symposium Events •

 

MyFavs - Explore and complete the "Formal Analysis" section on at least two of your Favs.
Try using as many "form words" (line, color, texture, contrast, balance, dominant... etc.) as possible -- basically, push yourself to see the abstract forms that provide the foundation for the finished design's impact.
Keep adding notes (or sketches) as you discover more aspects of your artist's work.

OurFavs - be sure your MyFavs document is linked to our shared OurFavs doc.

Series 2: Static, Relaxed, Dynamic
rough concept presentation

(Goal: have your design underway and developed enough that we understand it without explanation.
Imagery, type and arrangement should convey your unique graphic progression concept to us.
Have at least one of the three designs near completion in final materials. The other two should be sketched/developed enough that we can see where you're headed. )

Read: Design Basics
Read Ch. 11 on Motion/Movement (dynamism)

Online Canvas Class 10 Quiz

 

Class 11

[top]

Of Order, Sine Waves, Catarpillars and Dance
Reuben Margolin (portfolio)* :
On Kinetic Art (Pop Tech talk - 18m)
|(3.25 background) | (6:24 basic device*)
(13.45 Ptg school & alt realities)
TED talk: Sculpting Waves in Time***  (8.50m)
Gideon Obarzaneks Digital Moves (17m) | Contemp Dance |
Tom Shannon - gravity-defying sculpture
Mixed Portfolio of Kinetic Sculpture

Emphasis Ch. 3 intro
[ Bk-Des BasicsCh03Emph_Pt1.ppt or Bk-Des BasicsCh03Emph_Pt2.ppt ]

Design Principles: Dominance, Focal Points And Hierarchy - Smashing Magazine

"Emphasis is relative. For one element to stand out, another has to serve as the background from which the first is to stand out. Some elements need to dominate others in order for your design to display any sort of visual hierarchy." SmashingMag

Grabbing Visual Attention - Smashing Magazine

Assign Emphasis Analysis I

Crit/Review/Photo Static—Relaxed—Dynamic
(see notes, above)
— how are forms expressing your content-themes?  (shapes, color, lines...)
— do you have dominating elements to unify your designs?
— how are you build emphasis? ...and relief? ( crit sheet

Assign Series 3: Thematic Progression — 3 sets of concept sketches due next class.
Explore Series 3 priorities and goals.
(unity, variety, developing dominant form traits, continuity through the design. Emphasize expressing concept rather than illustrating a narrative.)

Meier Aesthetic Judgment test (discussion)
[ ppt: 2DC09 Meier1a Comparisons.ppt ]

____________________

 

Read: Design Basics
— read/review Chapter 3, on Emphasis

Online Canvas Class11 Quiz

Series 2: Static, Relaxed, Dynamic — All 3 designs roughly completed for presentation & critique. ( crit sheet )
( turn them in next class - today is final crit )

______________________________

 

Class 12

[top]

OnC: Another list of creative tips. Which haven't you tried? 30 Tips

OnC: A five day creative Recharge challenge
(note - a bit of coarse language)

3d Portraits...in Fabric: Benjamin Shine
Ribbon Portraits | At work | Wall TV | GImages | BShine Tulle Portf

 

Emphasis Ch. 3 cont'd
[ Bk-Des BasicsCh03Emph_Pt2.ppt or Bk-Des BasicsCh03Emph_Pt1.ppt]

Design Principles: Visual Weight And Direction - Smashing Magazine

"Every element on a web page exerts a visual force that attracts the eye of the viewer. The greater the force, the more the eye is attracted." - Smashing Mag

Line as expressive formal element ( 2DC05 Line Intro.ppt)

 

Meier Aesthetic Judgment test 2 (discussion)
[F09 2DC09 Meier1 Comparisons.ppt]

Discuss Emphasis Analysis
Caillebotte
| Tooker | Breugel

Emphasis & Unity Analysis II ( 2DC12e Analysis2 Set_StCritS09 .ppt )
(see Due Date notes for next class -
p133/Fortune Teller,
p273c Shipbreaking,
p200c Cabinet Makers)

- 2DC12e Analysis2 Set_StCrit.pptx
Sample Crits:
Ask yourself about focal areas and relief areas... where are they?
How are they established?
Analyze and write about dominating, unifying traits...
Ask yourself about variety... what provides it? Where has contrast and dynamism be introduced?
...Then compare your analysis with the comments posted here.

Watch for and Participate in your required Symposium Events
• Check this list of Current Symposium Events •

Emphasis Analysis I (turn in by email: gclayton@harding.edu)
(2DCrit003_Emphasis01)

Series 2: Static, Relaxed, Dynamic — All 3 designs fully completed for critique.
(final submission/due date NEXT class)
( crit sheet )

Order-Disorder Series: Series 3 — 3 sets of concept sketches. (ideas for three different ways to complete your series.)

Read: Design Basics
— read/review Chapter 3, on Emphasis

Online Canvas Class 12 Quiz


_________________________________

 

 

Class 13

[top]

Series 3: Thematic Progression - getting started


Exam Review Sheet | Sample Crits | Creative Process | Sample


Emphasis & Unity Analysis II - form critique

Textured Landscape/Levi van Veluw
Textured Landscape: Levi van Veluw, Landscape video
Levi van Veluw Origin of the Beginning 1.2
Origin of the Beginning 3.4

NOTE: test 1 week from now . ( review sheet )

Design Analysis/Crit:  2DEx1 Prep Crit1 Klimt-David-Gehry.pptx
Test formated questions.

Visual Elements: Texture
(Bk-Des BasicsCh09TextureA.pptx )

Emphasis & Unity Analysis II ( 2DC12e Analysis2 Set_StCritS09 .ppt )

Review Emphasis & Unity Analysis II -
2DC12e Analysis2 Set_StCrit.pptx

Sample Crits: Explore formal crits.
Challenge yourself to respond to the crit questions.
Then compare your responses to the posted crits.

Crit & Develop Order-Disorder series 3
— unity will be established how? What forms will be emphasized or repeated?
— what will be the dominating graphic theme?
— are the extremes well-established?
— is content conveyed by form (rather than by narrative/illustration)?

Crit Series 3 abstract and final concepts:
Is the theme stated clearly by the imagery/subject? (if any imagery is used).
Is the theme expressed by the forms of the design?
What formal traits unify the design? ...is there adequate variety?
Are areas of emphasis and relief well-established? (are focal areas distinctly bold and prominent? are relief areas subdued in contrast to support emphasis?)

 



 

 

Read: Design Basics (p. )

Online Canvas Class 13 Quiz

Emphasis & Unity Analysis II
turn in by email to: gclayton@harding.edu

(2DC12e Analysis2 Set_StCritF11 )
The works:
p. 133 Georges de la Tour—The Fortune Teller ( img alt | Image/Info | Project )
p. 250-251 273C Edward Burtynsky, Shipbreaking #10 (img | site | img )
p. 200C Jacob Lawrence, Cabinet Makers (| img ) (bio )

— For each image, describe:
a) at least three focal areas and
b) the tactics and forms that create those focal area.
c) traits and forms that unify the composition.

Series 2: Static, Relaxed, Dynamic — All 3 designs fully completed for critique.
(final submission)
( crit sheet )


_________________________________

Class 14

[top]

HU Public Safety: Stevens Art Center & Severe Weather
Go to interior hallways away from windows, ideally on 1st floor.

Spring '20 - Spring Sing Art Fair, Saturday April 11, 10am-2pm
Orientation Session TBA
Information and Signup Link

OnC: Draw Like a Child (3.30/4.15m)

NOTE: test next class. ( review sheet )

Test coming on Creative Process, Unity/Harmony, Emphasis, & Visual Elements. ( review sheet )

Sample Quiz: get familiar with the format of the test.

Creative Process:
Accept, Analyze, Define, Incubate, Ideate, Select, Implement, Evaluate, Let Go (& Live with it)

Sample Crits: Explore formal crits

Crit & Develop Series 3: Thematic Progression
— unity will be established how? What forms will be emphasized or repeated?
— what will be the dominating graphic theme?
— are the extremes well-established?
— is content conveyed by form (rather than by narrative/illustration)?

Crit Series 3 concepts:
Is the theme stated clearly by the imagery/subject? (if any imagery is used).
Is the theme expressed by the forms of the design?
What formal traits unify the design? ...adequate variety?
Are areas of emphasis and relief well-established? (are focal areas distinctly bold and prominent? are relief areas subdued in contrast?)

Watch for and Participate in your required Symposium Events
• Check this list of Current Symposium Events •

_________________________

Series 3: Thematic Progression
Concepts for theme, interpretation and dominating forms

 

 


_________________________________

 

Read: Design Basics (p. )

Online Canvas Class 14 Quiz

___________________________


Class 15

[top]

HU Public Safety: Stevens Art Center & Severe Weather
Go to interior hallways away from windows, ideally on 1st floor.

S20 - McInteer Art Competition - four living creatures/gospel writers themed concepts; 4x 4'x5'; $$; April 17 submission deadline.

Spring '20 - Spring Sing Art Fair, Saturday April 11, 10am-2pm
Orientation Session TBA
Information and Signup Link

Exam TODAY — Creative Process, Formal Critiques of Unity/Harmony, Emphasis, Relief & Visual Elements. ( review sheet )_________________________

NOTE: Spring 2020 -- Tues/Thurs Class - this Thursday (3/5) is a project work day.

Test Prep
— Know the 9 stages of the creative process.
— Know the (4 main) types of concept statements and how each is unique in its focus.
— Be familiar with visual elements and principles so that you can identify and describe focal areas, discuss formal traits that contribute to unity and variety. (explore design analyses)
( test review sheet )

Online Canvas Class 15 Quiz

Class 16

[top]

HU Public Safety: Stevens Art Center & Severe Weather
Go to interior hallways away from windows, ideally on 1st floor.

OnC: Counter-advice for Creatives: Embracing Spontaneity & Disorder

Thematic Progressions : present and discuss works undeway in final materials.
You piece should be self-explanatory -- it needs to make sense graphically rather than needing a verbal explanation.
Let's see how clear our concept is.

Step back and revisit your concept statement:
Content Concept: write a 25-50 word content concept statement. What are you trying to express to your viewer?
Response Concept: write a 25-50 description of how you would like your viewer to respond to your work.
Impact Concept: write a 25-50 description of how your design will grab the attention of the viewer.
Graphic Concept: describe the dominating and unifying forms in your design. Discuss how those forms express what your Content Concept is aiming to express.

Design for both unity and emphasis: Explore what formal traits might be emphasized -- develop a clear dominating, unifying graphic concept.

Identify tactics needed to build emphasis and establish relief.
What must pull the viewer's attention?
How will you build emphasis there?
How will you subdue emphasis elsewhere?

Watch for and Participate in your required Symposium Events
• Check this list of Current Symposium Events •


Series 3: Thematic Progression
- Abstract Form Concept: One graphic concept presented using purely abstract form -- no imagery, yet expressive of your theme.
-- Use forms that relate to your MyFavs artist/designer.

 

Online Canvas Class 16 Quiz

Class 17

[top]

Review Exam Results

S20 - McInteer Art Competition - four living creatures/gospel writers themed concepts; 4x 4'x5'; $$; April 17 submission deadline.

OnC: What does it take to get there?

On Perserverance & Calling
Finding your Calling | Practice Smart | Think like an Optimist

or..
see/read Mastery by George Leonard:
5 steps of mastery: 1. Instruction 2. Practice 3. Surrender 4. Intentionality 5. The Edge
Sivers Summary |
KlickerInc Outline | JamesClear Highlights |

OnC: 12 Documentaries To Spark Creativity
(trailers)
Who might inspire you forward?

__________________________
Small Group Crits of Series 3: Thematic Progression:

Complete and Discuss your Thematic Progression's Emotional Content Concept (pdf)

In your sketchbook, develop or refine your concept statements:
Particularly -- Content and Graphic
-- Content: describe the experience that begins your series, the experience that concludes your series, and the cause or influence that create the transformation from beginning to end.
-- Graphic: describe and sketch the dominating graphic forms (lines, shapes, colors, etc.) that will unify your design as well as expressing changing conditions throughout the series.

Get Feedback:
a) Show your work to each other and present your concepts...
b) How clear and apparent is the beginning and ending conditions? Do we feel what's changing?
c) Is there a clear, dominating, driving graphic element? (e.g. line, shape, color, texture...) How might it be used more effectively?
d) How is form working to express the message and attitude of each stage? Ignoring illustrative details, how is form expressing attitude and condition?
e) If this piece were recreated, from scratch -- what would you do differently?

Review and share your Thematic Progression.
Present it and your Emotional Content Concept to your peers.
a) How might your message or theme be more clear or more felt? Is there more needed to engage and interest the viewer?

b) How might your design be more unified graphically? ...how might it be simplified?

c) How might the focal areas be more fully developed? ...do relief areas need to be calmed or subdued?

Space, Depth, Illusion
[ Bk-Des BasicsCh10Space ]

Series 3: Thematic Progression
— draft of project - underway in final material.
— for crit.

 


Online Canvas Class 17 Quiz

Class 18

[top]

OnC: The 10-1/2 Commandments of Visual Thinking
Visual Thinking is for Everyone (v2.26)

Motion Sculpture - balance and rhythm by David C. Roy
Samples | Artist Site |

OnC: Escape Your Bubble

Watch for and Participate in your required Symposium Events
• Check this list of Current Symposium Events •

Nature Study Project intro for Group Design

Examples of Prior Projects
Required Content
Selecting your Subject
|
Which Format to do? (book, exhibition, flash/web, etc.)

Assign Groups
Before next class, you need to figure out your nature topic, and find samples of the subject.
Look over the examples of prior projects for ideas on how to approach the assignment.

A: Isabelle, Annie, Leah, Brenna Mae
B: Kathryn, Sammi, Daniel, Kendra, Colt
C: Maddy, Grace, Crystal, Emily, Ryan


Series 3: Thematic Progression— Revised, completed draft of project.
-- Rework your design making specific changes based upon your concept statements. Make specific changes
-- Present your work effectively finished.
-- Include presentation elements -- that is, if your piece is to be mounted on a board or on a base, have that with your work. Your work does *not* have to be permanently mounted, but we need to be able to see it in its final context.

 

Online Canvas Class 18 Quiz


Class 19

[top]

OnC: The Psychology of Creative Space
see followups: Light/Lighting | Noise | Music

Begin Group Rough Nature Study

Work in class with your team to develop a full "group Nature Study" -- create a large scale book or presentation based on your natural subject. This project is a short, group version of the longer individual project you will complete next.

a) Develop sketches that explore interesting and key traits of form... line, shape, color, balance and texture. (complete graphic intro roughs and initial form analysis)
— Take time to look hard at your subject — how is it put together?
— What traits make it distinctive and unlike anything else?
— Generate sketches of how you might graphically communicate any three formal topics.

b) Begin developing a rough story board: with sketches of your graphic concept for the study as a whole. Attempt to build the layout traits around the traits of your subject.
(what will the pages typically look like? Is there a template or grid that will guide layout?)

c) figure out what roles and responsibilties each group member will fulfill.

d) Develop a supply list. What materials will you need? (by next class, you'll need a specific "shopping list" of papers, boards, printing costs, etc. Your group will have a budget covered by your class fee. So save any receipts.

-- By the last hour today: (11.45am or 2.45pm)
-- Present us with your project's graphic concept


Series 3: Thematic Progression— Turn in, written crit and photograph.

Online Canvas Class 19 Quiz

Select your group's Nature Study Topic:
have a sample and ample images

Class 20

[top]

Continue your Group Nature Study.

By the end of class, your group needs to present:

a) a cover design under way
b) textual intro page under way
c) any other 3 pages nearly finished. .

At noon, be prepared to present your current concept and work to the rest of us.

Next class you will work to present us with your group's final, though rough, version of the entire Nature Study.

 

Intro Nature Study -- General intro to our final project and its initial challenges.

Nature Study Proposed Topics Email for Next Class... (see Next Class "Due Today")

Watch for and Participate in your required Symposium Events
• Check this list of Current Symposium Events •

Up close to the dark side of the Moon (YTube)

Online Canvas Class 20 Quiz

 


Class 21

[top]

Work to finish your group's Nature Study presentation.
Project presentations at 11.30/2.30

Nature Study Project intro

Examples of Prior Projects
Required Content
Selecting your Subject
|
Which Format to do? (book, exhibition, flash/web, etc.)

Form in Nature: explore your nature subject, and graphically represent as many formal traits as possible.

Line Traits | Shape Traits | Color Traits
Texture | Pattern
Structure | Balance
Harmony (Theme & Variation)

— Take time to look hard at your subject — how is it put together?
— What traits make it distinctive — unlike anything else?
— Generate sketches of how you might graphically communicate any three project topics.

-- IDA students to turn in initial concept/parti/source on Friday.

The Origin of Form —  Nature, Process and Function
In what ways might design solutions within nature provide new directions and insights for contemporary design?
Neri Oxman: On Designing Form (21m) | Michael Pawlyn: Nature's Genius in Architecture (17m) | Janine Benyus: 12 sustainable design ideas from nature (24m)

Creative Space design. Group Design Day4

Online Canvas Class 21 Quiz

 

Have an interesting object from nature with you.

 

Class 22

[top]

S20 - McInteer Art Competition - four living creatures/gospel writers themed concepts; 4x 4'x5'; $$; April 17 submission deadline.

3) Nature Study Project continued...

Examples of Prior Projects
Required Content
Selecting your Subject
Which Format to do? (book, exhibition, flash/web, etc.)

So what's your topic?
What subject will your own, personal Nature Study present?

Sketch and explore visual elements and principles of design...
Line
Shape
Color
Texture
Value
Pattern

Balance
Harmony, Theme & Variation
Repetition
Emphasis/Focal Areas
Range of Motion, Movement, Transformation

Sketchbook Presentation of your content ideas:
Fill (at least) 2 pages of your sketchbook with the key ideas that you will present in your Nature Study. 
Arrange your ideas/sketches so that they are clear, easy to understand and organized.  Make it possible for others to understand what content you have from these sketches and notes.

Topics should include ideas from...

-- the form
(elements and principles... line, pattern, color, texture, balance, etc.)  What forms or structures might I point out to my reader/user?  What forms or traits might I use in my layout's graphic concept or in my space design?
-- the history, cultural involvement, symbolism
How has my subject been viewed or used in other times and places?  Has it had a symbolic significance?  Has it had mythical meaning?    Were there historical events or periods in which my subject somehow played major role?
-- Relationship to other forms (refer to)
How is my subject related to a) other things in nature, b) prior design motifs, c) existing functional designs, d) fanciful functional designs?
-- the life cycle (changes in form over time/age);
the place in the eco system How does my subject interact with other species or natural resources?

 


Online Canvas Class 22 Quiz

 

Due Today:

By Email (GClayton@Harding.edu):

a) Review the Nature Studies by prior students that are posted online.
Tell me about the Nature Study that impresses you the most.
— Describe what ideas or information it introduced you to.
— Describe aspects of the design/presentation that impressed you.
(75-100 words; straight email...don't embed in an attached document)

b) List 3 potential subjects for your study.
Rank them (1, 2, 3) according to your preference.

c)    For each subject, include a brief description of why this particular subject interests you.
Describe the visual/formal/structural features that make this a worthwhile subject for a design-study subject. What are the traits of this subject that you might draw the reader's attention to? What forms present might inspire a space design?

d)     What medium/format do you intend to use (hand-crafted book, presentation boards (ID*), DTP, web, Flash, etc?)
If you're planning to use digital delivery, describe what tools/programs you are familiar with and what type of work/projects you have already completed using those tools/programs.

e)    an email address that you will check before next class.

*Note that Interior Design students will create an exhibition/space design concept, presented on presentation boards.

IntDes:  3 topics turned in by email, with basic research on each. Rank 1st/2nd/3rd Choice.

Bring sketches/model and notes on your possible topics.
Basically, dig deep enough into your topic that you have a more clear idea what you would share with us through your Nature Study -- find as much interesting content as possible before choosing your final subject.

Explore many aspects ---
-- the form (elements and principles... line, pattern, color, texture, balance, etc.),
-- the history, cultural involvement, symbolism.
-- the life cycle (changes in form over time/age); the place in the eco system.

So, get sketches, notes, clippings and bookmarks going that explore what you might want to show or explain to your reader/viewers.

In effect, begin answering the question:  What aspect of my nature-subject might I share with my readers/users that they would enjoy and appreciate? What is there that is interesting, surprising or beautiful that I might highlight?


Class 23

[top]

Nature as Source:
Find a link to an online video or web site that enlightens you to how nature is a rich source of ideas for... well, everything. Nature is designed with subtleties and solutions for visual design, for medical advancements and for technological progress.

For next class: Send me an email...
subject: Nature as Source
Include a link to the site or video.
An explanation (25-50 words) of the insight, ideas or solutions offered by nature's design as presented in this site or video.

[ 2DP20 Natl Forms.ppt ]
_________________________________________________

Nature Study Project discussion

Page Layout: ( 2DP20c Nature Study PgLayout.ppt )

Visual Field (shape, proportion, margins & extensions)
Graphic Hierarchy ( 1 ) & Visual Flow
Graphic Theme
(unity, visual elements, traits/character of elements)

Emphasis & Relief (contrast, simplicity/brevity, white space)
Essential Content (written, imagery, connotations, layout)
Structure (balance, organization, axes, alignments, grid)

For next Class:  develop sketches of a cover design, splash page or initial space plan.

Watch for and Participate in your required Symposium Events
• Check this list of Current Symposium Events •


Email assignment on Nature as Source in design
(see class notes on left).

IntDes: 
Research on final topic.
3d sketch/model abstracting the key forms that you might use in to build or to inspire your final design.

For All:

1) Select your topic for your own, individual Nature Study.
Decide what subject in nature you'll explore over the next several weeks.
Be able to describe the traits that make this an interesting and valid topic for your Nature Study.

 

Due Today:

Initial Nature Study Concept Statement
Write an initial Concept Statement that describes what will be unique and distinctive about your Nature Study. (30-60 words)
What are you aiming for?
What will make your design unique?
How is the subject, content or focus of your study distinctive?
(turn in by email: GClayton@Harding and bring

 

 

 

Online Canvas Class 23 Quiz

Class 24

[top]

Design in Nature
Golden Mean, Golden Proportion, Fibonacci Numbers
(Part 1/4 — 2D Golden Mean4a.ppt )
Aesthetics/Beauty
Moderation in all things
Proportion and the Golden Mean
Parthenon & the Greek Ideal (intro Pt 1/4)
Intro Video: The Golden Mean

Nature Study Topics ( 2DP20b Nat St Des Elems.ppt )
Line
Shape
Color
Texture
Pattern
Balance...

Storyboard/Sketches of Nature Studies

Assignment for Next Class... (see Next Class "Due Today")

Isometric Notes (These notes are a bit messy... no, a lot messy.... on using Adobe Illustrator to convert a floor plan into an isometric.)


Sign up for the Spring Art & Design Chicago Trip

Be sure you have completed your required Symposium Events
• Check this list of Current Symposium Events •

 

IntDes:
Propose final function and site context for project.

Due: Storyboard/sketches of document layout concept:
Complete a 1/4+ size
storyboard of your cover design, table of contents, intro page, and 1 Visual Elements page. (4 pages)

--    Explore/consider which graphic features will be the same on each page, and which features will vary.

    Explore a theme or a "personality" for your presentation.   What kind of a mood do you want to create?
--    Consider bounding elements -- a border, or other bounding features that effectively contain the page's content.
--    Be sure that content elements have greater emphasis than decorative elements.

Document your progress: in class, photo and log your sketches.

 

Due: Initial Rough Sketches of Cover Design (or Splash Page or Initial spaceplan Board) for your Nature Study
Develop three distinctly different design concepts (sketches) for the cover, splash page or 1st board of your study.
You may use pencil, colored pencil, marker, computer type/layout — most any medium will do.  
Rough sketches of concepts may be 1/2 size or larger. 
Nature studies are usually 9in.x12in., so your roughs should be 4.5" x 6" or larger.

The goal is to have explored your initial graphic concepts — explore colors, typefaces, paper, repeating graphics, etc.  Ask yourself — what graphics or arrangements will be consistently used throughout my pages? What will unify one page with the next?
Develop an initial graphic concept to establish unity/continuity through your entire presentation. Note that you will surely change, revise and possibly replace these initial concepts. Nevertheless, get you head into solving this design problem.

Online Canvas Class 24 Quiz

Class 25

[top]

No Class Meeting at the regular time.
Instead, we'll meet one-on-one by appointment to review your progress and plans.

You and I will meet one-on-one in my office — Art 224...across from upstairs elevator, down the hall, on the left.

Sign up for meeting time during the prior class ( or email me for a time if you miss the sign-up during class)

 

Nature Study Review Meeting topics
We'll have a short time to meet, but these are the topics that may come up:

Review page design features.
(have color layout sketch of 3 pages (or 1 board) dealing with Visual Elements and Formal Relationships &
story boards for all pages or boards with you)

— Your Concept Statements:
(Content, Graphic, Impact, Response and for IDA, source/Parti )

Be ready to discuss which content topics your study might include
Which of the suggested, required or optional content topics do you feel might be most interesting and informative?.

Be ready to discuss the medium/format you are using.
Do you anticipate any problems using or finding the tools/materials needed?
Do you expect any areas of implementation process or craft to be difficult or tricky?

— How will you engage the reader/viewer? 
What traits of your presentation will draw them in and build interest?

— How are you fully exploiting your medium? 
What are you doing with your materials/medium that cannot be done with other media?.

Take and log photos of progress.

 

 

Sign up for the Spring Art & Design Chicago Trip

 

Be ready to discuss
your expanded concept statement
s

Write at least three focused concept statements that describe specific aspects of your general conception of what your nature study will be — more particularly, write any three of the focused concepts noted below.

Content concept
What do you want to express or evoke?
What kind of information are you going to present?|
What kind of mood or attitude are you aiming to project or to evoke?

Graphic Concept
What visual traits will make your presentation graphically distinctive?
Colorful? Tightly organized?

Impact Concept
What tactics will you use to grab the viewer's attention and keep it?
— Insightful or interesting information? Extensive, well-ordered information?
— Elegant layout and design?
— Humor? Odd characters? Playful imagery?
— An engaging story or narrative?

Response Concept
How do you want your viewers/readers to respond?
(do you want a sense of "wow! I didn't know that!". Are you aiming for humour? Do you want to instill a sense of wonder? Do you want the viewer to be impressed by the complexity of order or the many facts about your subject?)

Source Concept/Parti
What is the source of inspiration for your design? What traits of your subject might inform your final book or space design?

Bring With You:
Tight sketches/notes of 3 or more pages, including your Visual Elements pages and one of your 'Formal Relationships' pages.

Show the content you'll be including on these pages, and the graphics and/or text that will communicate that content.

Online Canvas Class 25 Quiz

Class 26

[top]

*** Art/Design Chapel - Thursday at 9am in Art 117 *** (F19)

Sign up for the Spring Art & Design Chicago Trip

Symposium Survey: Be sure to fill this survey out.
Note you only need to fill it out once, no matter how many of your art & design classes involve symposium requirements.
Note that you still need to turn in your symposium reports for this course via your Canvas assignments (the symposium reports are listed after the course quizzes.)

Golden Mean, Golden Proportion, Fibonacci Numbers
(Part 2/4 — 2D Golden Mean4b.ppt )
Vitruvius Man, Leonardo & the Golden Mean
The Human Canon and the golden ratio.

Nature by Numbers: Nature, Design & Golden Mean (video)* (3.44)
More visually inspiring, than overtly informational, but nicely done. Vimeo Alt


Intro Video: Golden Ratio in the Human Body
* (7min)
Introduces Fibonacci as related to numbers to Golden Ratio to the Canon of Human Proportions, bronchia, cochlia. as well as other living things.
Top 10 Places to find Golden Ratio* (11min)
A "perfect number"? Why 1.618034 is so important** (9.36)

Fibonacci Sequence Documentary (30.30min)
BBC Documentary - History of Fibonacci Numbers (53 min)

Videos on Art, Design & Nature
Math-Art-Nature Intro
Spirals in Nature/Nautilus Shell - basic theme & variation intro.
Computer-aided Pattern Design/Carpeting
Repetitive Patterns in Decorative Design
Fractals, Repetition and Fractional Dimensions
Fractals, Ferns and Landscape
Fractals and Image/Video-Compression
Fractals intro

15 Golden Mean Examples in Nature
Fibonnaci in NatThe Golden Ratio & Fibonacci Numbers: Fact versus Fictionure **

The Golden Ratio & Fibonacci Numbers: Fact versus Fiction
a 2hr Stanford lecture that digs into the math and the legends.
MathIsFun | TedTalk- MathEd & Fibonnaci * |

Spirals & Golden Ratio in Nature

 

Be sure you have completed your required Symposium Events
• Check this list of Current Symposium Events •

 

Makeup Quizzes are OPEN

 

DUE BEFORE CLASS BY EMAIL (gclayton@harding.edu) :
Review Web Sites on Golden Mean, Fibonacci numbers, & Golden spiral:

( see project resources link on the Nature Study page)

n     Do an online search on golden mean, Fibonacci numbers, golden spiral, design in nature, etc. Look for sites, articles or books that discuss how the golden mean is present in natural forms.

— Turn in 3 links and/or references to sites, articles or books that discuss design in nature.
— Turn in via email (GClayton@Harding.edu). 
 
— For each link or reference, write a brief description of the main content found in that resource.
(extra points for the first submissions of new & valuable resources.)
Check web, books in Library, journal/magazine articles, etc.

Have with you in class:

a) Your concept statements (they can be written in your sketchbook, or whereever). Be sure you're exploring all essential aspects of your design.
What is your graphic concept? — layout, colors, type, materials, imagery style/techniques.
What is your content concept? — what information do you want to convey?
What is your response concept? — what mood or response do you want to evoke in your viewer/reader?
What is your impact concept? — how will your design get, and hold your viewer/reader's attention? What will engage your viewer/user?

b) Your storyboard sketches of your entire project.
Show you overall layout plan. Include color choices, type choices and placement/layout.


c) Rough designs & illustrations for at least 3 pages of your study.
You may finish these pages, but you should, at least, thoroughly work out what will be included, and where, on these pages. Tight roughs, at least.

d) Due Today:(BRING TO CLASS):

n     Find at least one example of the golden mean, spiral structure, fibonnacci numbers, or any repeated pattern/structure that is present in your chosen nature study subject.  
n     Create an
annotated drawing, illustration or diagram that graphically communicates that feature.

 

____ In class: Take and log photos of progress.
__ Place your ID/logo/name in each photo (use your Personal Mark if you like)
__ Take photos of all work/sketches/models thus far.
__ Take photos of your concept statements as well.

Online Canvas Class 26 Quiz

Isometric Notes

Class 27

[top]

Golden Mean, Golden Proportion, Fibonacci Numbers
(Pt. 3/4 — 2D Golden Mean4c.ppt (cont'd))
Golden Mean applied to the design of paintings, ceramics, etc.
Intro Video: Fibonacci Number — The Fingerprint of God
(3.44 very nice animations linking Fibonacci numbers to natural forms.)

Intro Video: Fibonacci's Fractals (5:26 text and images/charts explore the fractal nature of the universe.)

Video: The Fibonacci Sequence (4:12 Music & allusiv e images)

Fabulous Fibonacci Flower Formula ( 11.26 min)

Mandelbrot Set Zoom Vids | 1 |

Project Review Day: functionalism — design versus objectives

Explore your current design and plans in comparison to your concept statement (goals, objectives, priorities).

Revisit the "Define Stage" of your creative problem-solving.
How might you now refine your concept?
ask: Is my concept statement complete and specific enough?

Explore the design, ideas and content of your Nature Study:
ask: Is my design being guided by the
outcomes my concept aims for?
Are there parts of my design that have nothing to do with my concept?
Are there any priorities within my concept that are not gettng enough attention in my design?

In Class:
1) Complete the Concept/Functionalist Self-Crit
2) Take photos of all sketches, designs and notes for your Nature Study. (include an ID/Label in each image)
3) Sign up for a one-on-one appointment for next class.

 

Some Bookbinding Ideas &   Resources

Perfect Binding | Saddle Stitch With Thread | Saddle Stitch With Staples | Dos-a-Dos Saddle Stitched | Coptic Stitch Binding Tutorial | Japanese Stab Stitch Bookbinding | Accordion Book (below left) | Screw Posts
http://images2.mybinding.com/www.mybinding.com/SO038ASP-sma.jpg


Due:
Written Intro Page and Graphic Intro page (near-) completed in final materials.

_______________________________________
Due completed so far: Cover/Splash (1); Textual Intro (1); Graphic Intro (1); Visual Elements (2+); Formal Relationships (2+); Thumbnails/Relationships (1+); Romans Essay (1)
;

+Credits/Reference (1 if needed)

Visual Elements Pages (2pgs of 2+) completed,
Due: Have completed the Design Functionalism Self-Crit

Announcement:
Going to see the art, design and architecture in Chicago?
Check out the trip info

Online Canvas Review Quiz: Chapters 1 - 5
(12 questions)
(NOTE: this quiz will be open longer just in case Thanksgiving threw off your schedule.)

Class 28

[top]

 

Symposium Survey: Be sure to fill this survey out.
Note you only need to fill it out once, no matter how many of your art & design classes involve symposium requirements.
Note that you still need to turn in your symposium reports for this course via your Canvas assignments (the symposium reports are listed after the course quizzes.)

Golden Mean, Golden Proportion, Fibonacci Numbers
(Part 4/4 — 2D Golden Mean4b.ppt )

Golden Mean, Golden Proportion, Fibonacci Numbers
(Part 4/4 — 2D Golden Mean4d.ppt )

Golden Spiral,
spirals in the organization/structure of living organisms,
Fibonnaci numbers,
Golden ratioIntro Video: 1.618 Phi, The Golden Ratio, God, an Intelligent Design presentation. (4min)
Parthenon2 |


Video: The Mandelbrot Set: Arthur C. Clark, Barnsley, Stephen Hawkings and Benoit Mandelbrot introduce the Mandelbrot set and fractals. (10:29 This is an early video with now-primitive technology, but Clark's into comments are worthwhile. Includes a history of the discovery of the set.)
Mandelbrot Set: how it is generated (8:11 -- begins with Mandelbrot set and then digs into Julia sets. The first portion is of general interest. After that, the video gets more specialized.)

Traversals of Fractals:
Video: Fractal Art: a foray into Mandelbrot and other fractals. (5.18)
Video: Deepest Mandelbrot Set Zoom Animation ever - a New Record! 10^275 (2.1E275 or 2^915)
Video: Mandelbulb 3D 1.67 (1.47 A sort of deep-sea-scape fly-through based on a simple fractal formula)
Video: Sierpinski Dream (2.32 Flythrough of a Sierpinski solid.)
Video: 2010: A Mandelbrot Odyssey ( 10.51 A pleasant fly-through, in and out of various regions of the Mandelbrot set. Its a bit long...so feel free to scrub along.)

Mandelbrot...roughness...scale...fractals
Benoit Mandelbrot: Fractals and the art of roughness
(22m video; Mandelbrot's presentation on the measure of roughness in nature, 3 mos. before his death.)

__________________________________________

NOT YET DUE:
Essay on Romans 1:20 page — (1pg);
Table of Contents page — (1pg).
Textual Intro (1pg)
Credits/References (if needed)
Digital documentation
Final touch-up,
mounting/binding.

Critique and Discuss project progress.

NOT YET DUE:
Essay on Romans 1:20 page — (1pg);
Table of Contents page — (1pg).
Textual Intro (1pg)
Credits/References (if needed)
Digital documentation
Final touch-up,
mounting/binding.

PLEASE NOTE: computer lab hours are NOT predictable during dead week and finals week.
If you are planning to use the labs for scanning, editing, or printing, you will have to find out what hours the lab will be open during these periods.

Online Canvas Review Quiz: Chapters 6-12
(14 questions)
(NOTE: this quiz will be open longer.)

Due :Graphic Intro Page (1+ pg)

Due : Thumbnails/Relationship to other forms (1+ pg)

Due : Formal Relationships Pages (2 of 2+) completed

Due : Cover Page (1)

Take and log photos of progress.

_______________________________________
Due completed so far: Cover/Splash (1) ;Graphic Intro (1); Visual Elements (2+); Forma Relationships (2+); Thumbnails/Relationships (1+);

 

 

MAKEUP Online Canvas Quizzes:
— check the Main Canvas Page for info taking makeup quizzes this week!

(3 optional quizzes; 1 try each; replace earlier low/missing quizzes; open until midnight Sunday before Finals)

 

Class 29

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Canvas Makeup Quizzes

If you have missed quizzes or would like to try to improve your grade on your quizzes, you can take any or all of these MakeUp Quizzes.  
These are voluntary — you do not have to take these MakeUp Quizzes.  
Good scores on these quizzes will replace low scores on earlier quizzes...or missed quizzes.  If your existing quiz scores are better than the score you earn on a MakeUp Quiz, then you will keep the better existing quiz score — thus, if you take these MakeUp Quizzes, your overall quiz score will either improve, or, at worst stay the same.

— Each quiz has 10 questions.
— Each quiz will be limited to 15 minutes.
— Each quiz may be taken ONCE  — not the usual 3 attempts.  Thus, its smart to skim over the chapters before beginning these quizzes.
— These quizzes may be completed as late as midnight on Sunday, the day before Final Exams begin.

Be sure you have completed your required Symposium Events
• Check this list of Current Symposium Events •

Art & Design Symposium Survey -- Complete this survey about your symposium activities...
...AND, be sure to report on all of your Symposium activities on Canvas by Sunday before Finals Week.
The "Symposium Event or Activity" assignments are listed at the end of your quizzes on Canvas.

Nature Study

 

Due :Graphic Intro Page (1+ pg)

Due : Thumbnails/Relationship to other forms (1+ pg)

Due : Formal Relationships Pages (2 of 2+) completed

Due : Cover Page (1)

Take and log photos of progress.

_______________________________________
Due completed so far: Cover/Splash (1) ;Graphic Intro (1); Visual Elements (2+); Forma Relationships (2+); Thumbnails/Relationships (1+);

 

MAKEUP Online Canvas Quizzes:
— check the Main Canvas Page for info taking makeup quizzes this week!
(3 optional quizzes; 1 try each; replace earlier low/missing quizzes; open until midnight Sunday before Finals)

Class 30

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Canvas Makeup Quizzes are open

Remember that Final projects are presented Friday at 2pm (Fall 19).

Thursday/Friday
Final Class Day:
We will meet Friday to TURN IN, review and critique your nature studies

At 11am/2pm Friday you are to have your Nature Study Project ready to review and turn in.


• Until then, complete project tasks, including scanning your nature study, photographing it or otherwise creating a digital copy of it.

  • During class:
  • Get a copy of the written critique   |   PDF Form-Version
  • Lay your nature study out where others can view it.
  • Clear the tables except for the nature studies.
  • Read over the last page of the critique packet.
  • Look through each of the other nature studies... note which ones are particularly successful, and why.
  • Rank the top nature studies on the last page of the critique packet.
  • At some point, we'll stop and talk about the class' projects.
  • If you have not yet done so, complete the Digital Documentation of your project (see notes below)
  • If you have time, you can continue to fill out your written self-critique.
  • When the group critique is over, you are free to go as long as you've finished your documentary photos, and the peer critique, on the last page.
    The rest of the self-crit packet may be turned in as late as your final exam period.

Digital documentation :

  • Scan or photograph all pages of your study well.
  • Shoot extra detail (closeup) shots of any special or unusual features.
  • Make sure lighting is adequate -- not too dark nor over explosed.
  • Avoid glare -- arrange lights and position of camera to eliminate "hot spots" in the image. Usually the camera's built-in Flash should be turned OFF.
  • Sharp focus -- be sure to hold still to avoid motion blur
  • Fill the frame with your image -- don't waste the picture frame on useless background.
  • Prepare a clean and undisturbing background...use one of the backdrops or drop cloths to give you a clean background for your image.
  • All images should be in .jpg (.jpeg) format, at roughly 3megpixels (not too small and not tooooo large, please)
  • Ideally your images should be named or numbered in order...Images of the cover first.
  • If submitting on a memory key or CD-R, put your image files in a folder, and name the folder with your name and "NS" (for "nature study" ; e.g. "NSDavidBurks" )
  • Turn in images on a CD-R (several students/projects may be on the same CD) or a memory key, unless you use one of the instructor's cameras.
  • By When?:   Digital documentation may be turned in as late as 4pm today.
  • Note: If your presentation is a web site or Flash presentation, your CD-R should include:
    a) a folder with all final project files organized in appropriate hierarchy/subfolders. (so the site/presentation can be viewed as designed from the CD),
    b) a folder with all production/working files (e.g. fla's) , as well as
    c) a folder with .jpg screen-dumps of each page of your site/presentation.
    d) a ReadMe text file with any notes on missing pieces, non-functional content or system/install requirements.

PLEASE NOTE: computer lab hours are NOT predictable during dead week and finals week.
If you are planning to use the labs for scanning, editing, or printing, you will have to find out what hours the lab will be open during these periods.

If you have missed quizzes or would like to try to improve your grade on your quizzes, you can take any or all of these MakeUp Quizzes.  
These are voluntary — you do not have to take these MakeUp Quizzes.  
Good scores on these quizzes will replace low scores on earlier quizzes...or missed quizzes.  If your existing quiz scores are better than the score you earn on a MakeUp Quiz, then you will keep the better existing quiz score — thus, if you take these MakeUp Quizzes, your overall quiz score will either improve, or, at worst stay the same.

— Each quiz has 10 questions.
— Each quiz will be limited to 15 minutes.
— Each quiz may be taken ONCE  — not the usual 3 attempts.  Thus, its smart to skim over the chapters before beginning these quizzes.
— These quizzes may be completed as late as midnight on Sunday, the day before Final Exams begin.

Be sure you have completed your required Symposium Events
• Check this list of Current Symposium Events •

______________________

 

 

Announcement:
Going to see the art, design and architecture in Chicago?
Check out the trip info.

Online Canvas Review Quiz: Chapters 6-12
(14 questions)
(NOTE: this quiz will be open longer.)

All work to be turned in, is to be turned in today.

Your Nature Study project is due.

 

Note on Final Exam:
No written test will be given in class during the scheduled exam period. That is, you do not have to be here during the scheduled exam time.

However, by the final exam period, you are to have completed your written self-crit of your Nature Study.
Turn this in by the end of your scheduled Final Exam period.
The final Nature Study critique may be turned in:
a) directly to the professor,
b) to the Art & Design office manager (ask her to put it in my box), or
c) by sliding it under my office door (Art 225)

The sooner you turn in your Nature Study Self-Crit, the sooner I can begin to grade your project. Thus, if you want your Nature Study back early, you need to turn in your self-crit early.

Send me an email confirming that you've turned it in, and where you turned it in.

_______________________________________
Due completed so far: Cover/Splash (1); Textual Intro (1); Graphic Intro (1); Visual Elements (2+); Formal Relationships (2+); Thumbnails/Relationships (1+); Romans Essay (1)
;

+Credits/Reference (1 if needed)

 

MAKEUP Online Canvas Quizzes:
— check the Main Canvas Page for info taking makeup quizzes this week!

(3 optional quizzes; 1 try each; replace earlier low/missing quizzes; open until midnight Sunday before Finals)

 

31

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Final Exam Period

[See final class notes, above.]

Final Exam:
Turn in your Nature Study written critique by the end of your official final exam period.
Turn it in at my office -- Art 225, down the hall across from the elevator.
Either give it to me, or slide it under my office door.
If I'm not in my office when you turn it in, send me a quick email letting me know when you turned it in. ( gclayton@harding.edu )

 

PICK UP GRADED NATURE STUDIES

I will leave graded Nature Studies in the hall, outside of my office once they are graded.
I do not begin grading your Nature Study until I have your written critique packet. I usually get projects graded within 2 or 3 days of receiving your crit.
"Requested Project Pick-Up Time" -- near the top of your crit packet, there is a question about when you would like to pick up your graded project (in effect, tell me when you are leaving Searcy). While I cannot guarantee that I'll have your project graded before you leave, I will prioritize grading for those leaving town early who also turned in their crits quickly. Also, I'm happy to store your graded project until the beginning of the next semester.


[See final class notes, above.]

Scheduled Exam Periods:
Mon/Wed Class: Monday, 10.30a - 12.30
Tues/Thurs Class: Wednesday, 8:00a - 10a.m.

Final Exam Period

[See final class notes, above.]

 

Class Topics and Activities

Requirements
• readings • supplies • due dates

                 

Greg Clayton
Design Foundations I
Design Foundations II

Senior Seminar

 
Photography Course
 
Course Schedule
Course Schedule
 
Independent Study
 
               © 2019 Greg Clayton/ gclayton@harding.edu