Creative Space1

Art 200 / Greg Clayton

Create spaces that facilitate creative process make a place where creating is irresistible.

 

Creative Space1

Your job is to conceive the most wonderful place in which to create ever!
Design a space that contributes to the creativity of its users.
It could be an artist's studio, a design firm, a recording studio, a retreat center, a therapeutic clinic, or a school.
Or...?

What would be the perfect environment to create in?     
What traits would it have?
                    Nature...silence...music...imagery...urban... low light...natural light?
What would it look like?          
                    Tidy? Messy? Open? Sparse? Packed with goodies?
What furniture or things or places would be there?
                    Computers? Stereo? Storage? Light tables? Projection screens? Easels?
Where would it be?        
                    Downtown Manhatten?    At the beach?   In the Alps?    In a rainforest?

Take a look at actual creative spaces out there

Limitations:

Your design is for an space of up to 4500* square feet — create your concept of an ideal, inspiring creative workspace.
You may include, and design a surrounding outdoor area of up to a half acre** (encompassing/including the enclosed space.)
You may propose any loosely plausible location, materials, budget, technologies.

* for instance, 67'x67'
** a half acre is 21780 square feet. For instance 150'x150' is just about a half acre.

 

First Decision: Who is your client?

Before you design the "what", you've got to understand the "who" -- who is this for?
The users of your space serve by creating better ideas and better solutions -- their success must depend on ongoing, insightful and innovative ideas.
What kinds of professionals or organizations rely on creative output?

You'll need to answer a series of questions that get you into their world, their activities and their needs. Who are they, what do they do, what tasks or activities are performed in their space, what sort of spaces, then, must be incorporated into this design? Each reality informs the next.

So, take time to get to know your client. Write notes about each of the concerns mentioned. Get to know them.

 

Here are some possible options. You might use one of these, or, better, conceive your own organization!

Little Rock Arts Magnet High School:
What kind of facility would enable high school students to best develop and explore their creative gifts? Design a shared space for artists, photographers, musicians, actors, cinemaphotographers, playwrights, novelists and poets. This is not the school as a whole, but a creative space.
What a library is to research, this space is to creativity.

A service organization: Habitat for Humanity, Heifer International, etc.
These groups need ideas for how to best help others. What kind of space might be included in their headquarters solely to facilitate exploration of effective service?

Pixar:
Pixar thrives on creative ideas. They rely on technology, to be sure, but story, concept, graphics and characters all have to be creatively developed.
What kind of environment would best promote their work?

Nike:
Yes, even shoes involve creative exploration.

Google:
Google is an idea company. They thrive on generating ideas that help people, and then designing tools that implement those ideas.
Where might such ideas best be developed?

NASA:
How do we get to Mars? How do we go beyond Venus and the planets? What would a settlement on another planet look like? These are creative problems long before they become realities.
If NASA had a Creative Vision retreat center or workshop, what might it be like? If scientists and engineers could spend, say, one day a month in this creative recharge center, what would be there?
What kind of environment would help scientists and creative thinkers work together to explore our next frontiers?

An Interior Design office or a Graphic Design firm.
Don't necessarily aim to design for a huge corporate site — its usually best to aim for a firm of 9 or fewer folks. Often a very small working group is even better.

Creative Retreat Center:
Create a sort of get-away resort for creative teams to visit and work together — a place to brainstorm on tough projects during the analysis, incubation and ideation stages of their group design process.

A painter/sculptor/composer/writer or other individual artist:
Be as specific as possible. You might research a particular composer or artist. Discover what you can about their creative process — how do they work, how do they spend a typical day? Could you design a space that would keep them stimulated, enthused and innovative?

Other:
You may propose a client that has a specific creative mission.
Explore what they really do. Think about how they might actually develop products and services that are powerful, engaging and effective.
Take time to list and describe what they do -- think about the many particular tasks that would fill their day.
Present what they do, who their clients are, and what your space will do to meet their need for a truly creative environment.

 

Analysis:

Prior Solutions:
What have other businesses, artists or design firms used? What kind of spaces to professional creatives create for themselves?
What kinds of creative spaces are out there?
Explore ideas so you can build on the best!

Ergonomics: design for human beings
Ergonomics generally addresses how design objects, spaces and machines successfully interface with people. In recent years the topic has emphasized healthy working conditions to avoid injury, especially common office problems that produce eye strain, back problems and carpel tunnel syndrome.
A good intro to the topic from ergo-plus.com | AllSteel Guide (pdf) |

For our project, you are expected to design adequate space for use of all work areas, and appropriate placements for use of, or access to tools and materials.

The Client/User: Since you are "part client" and all designer on this project, you'll need to explore who your client is.
— You'll need to know who you are creating this for — what kind of creative person/firm are you designing for?
Possibilties: A team of industrial designers? A solo painter? A drama troupe? A special Art Education school? A small web design firm?
— Explore and list the tasks that will be done here.
(get specific... what work stations, supplies, presentations, inspiration spaces are needed?)
— Decide how many people will create here. Is it just one of you...5 of you... a corporate design team of several dozen? (recommended: 9 or fewer for our project)

Function:
What activities are facilitated by this space?
What must there be space to do?

Define Concept:
What are your priorities?
                What mood, attitude, or feel do you want to establish?

Presentation:
After developing your concept, you'll communicate your concept to the rest of us.
Use images, plans, words or whatever works best, you will convey your concept, to us.

Day1   |    Day2    |     Day3

Space1 — collaborative

First Day, In Class: 

Break into small, diverse teams.
(3-5 people in each group; make sure you have a variety of majors and interests.)
Start into your Analysis creative stage.
Get to know the problem.
Start proposing and discussing who your client might be, and what the function of your space might be.
You can wait until next class to commit to these details, but get started exploring the options and how each group member feels about them.

By the end of class
-- have a short list of clients (1-3) -- include a brief description of what they do.
-- have a short list (1-3 ideas) of what this space might used for. What activities occur here? Describe what this designed environment supposed to make possible.

*** Turn in a list of the group members names and email addresses. ***

Second Day, In Class:  Rough Space Concept Presentation

[If you were absent last class, contact Mr. Clayton about finding a group.] Design Teams

Explore your client,
your concept, and
3 key features of your workspace.

Get your head around the project (Creative Process: Accept & Analysis & Define)
Explore the assignment further:
What do you know about what you're going for?
What are the assigned goals?
What is distinctive about this space?

Commit to the client and function for your space: refine your concept & goals
Who is this for? Write notes on what these people do, and how they would use your space.
What purpose does this space serve? What activities must the space facilitate or encourage?

Generate ideas:
Get a big sheet of paper and some markers/pens.
Write your ideas...begin your lists...your "do's", "don'ts", "wants" and such.
Start collecting what you know about this project.

Brainstorm on what might be done...no rules...no judgements...no 'no's'. Just ideas.
Explore creative spaces that others have conceived. Write and sketch lots of odd and wonderful possibilities.

Prioritize: What absolutely must be accomplished by this design?
What is important to achieve or include?
What would be nice features if they can be "fit in"?

During class prepare to:(12.15/3.15 present)
Client/user/activities description:
-- Have a clear client description including the activities, services and values that define how they are unique.
Who uses this space, and what do they do in it?

Concept Statement:
What makes your space a distinctively special place for creative activity?
-- Write an initial draft of concept statement for your space.
-- Have a description of the mood or attitude to be evoked by the space.

Orienting imagery:
-- Have some rough, initial sketches or maquettes (small models) of at least 2 ideas for your space.
What might it look like?
-- List and highlight 3 key features of your workspace.
-- be sure that the first image we see, gives us an overall sense of your space...then show us details and particulars.

-- Have each group member commit to tasks or to problems to solve before next class.

Present this to the professor -- usually beginning around 12.15/3.15

 

Third Day, In Class: 

Initial version of final concept presentation
Present final on 30x40 board. (provided in class)

Develop an initial draft of your formal 30x40 presentation board.
This board graphically and textually communicates your distinct solution.
Aim for a self-explanatory presentation — the board should introduce and "sell" your creative concept to the client.
Graphics or text can be taped or pinned in place -- your goal is to have all the essential parts included. Later you can clean them up for a formal presentation board.

Note that the first part of class will be spent working in groups, revising and developing your presentations.It doesn't have to be perfect, it just needs to get your ideas down on paper so that each member of your team can understand what's being considered. Make many variations...lay down fresh paper and trace over early ideas to create improved ideas...keep revising. (Paper is cheap. Ideas are only precious until a better one comes along. Keep generating better and better ideas...on paper!) 

Create a visual presentation that successfully communicates your concept -- without verbal explanations.
Be sure to include:
a) Client description and activites
b) A concept statement declaring what features or conditions enable this space to nurture creative excellence.
c) Visuals that will orient the viewer, and visually explain your space.
d) Details, materials, samples, notes or other views that will make your specific design concept clear. .

You may pick a wall space and tape/pin your concept presentation up. You may pin/tape your work up to the walls, bulletin boards and cabinets in the classroom.  (It can be handy to create a huge backing sheet that you can tape other images to. Use one of the large rolls of paper.)
Develop your group's concept and rough presentation of your ideal creative space.
Goal: communicate your distinctive concept as fully as possible using images and text.
Help viewers understand how you design is unique and whose needs your design serves. Help us imaging being in your space — give us enough plans, elevations, views or details that we can see you space in our own imagination.
This does NOT need to be a thoroughly unified presentation, but you should be giving attention to organizing your imagery and text for a unified composition.
Plan on a brief (verbal) introduction to your concept, and be ready to take questions when we need things explained.

During class prepare to: (noon/3pm present)
-- Present a rough, full size presentation of your space concept. It might include sketches and notes and diagrams quickly taped or pinned in place.
-- Include a finished concept statement, a client description, and a list of tasks or activities that this space facilitates.
-- Informally present your concept and statements to the rest of class. Take up to 3 minutes to tell us about your design. Introduce us to how your space solves the needs of your client. Be ready to respond to questions and feedback.

Verbally introduce your concepts.
"Walk us through" the space.
Take questions on your concept.
THEN ask viewers (classmates) — "what is unclear? what is missing? what questions do you have as you look at the presentation?"

Presentations will begin roughly 12 noon and 3pm

Fourth Day, In Class:  Final Draft Concept Presentation

Today you're working towards a finished presentation -- a board (and optional model) to introduce your design solution.
You'll have one more class to finalize the presenation, but today you want to have the presentation completed so that you can discover any flaws, missing pieces or confusing elements.

You'll present at 12noon or 3pm.

Rough presentation:

Concept statement
Present this where viewers can see it — make it a part of your graphic presentation.
What central concept guides your design/solution?  What idea drives this space?
Describe what is unique and special about what you offer your clients.
Content Concept: When planning a space, the function of the space is an aspect of its content. So, explore both the function and the mood, attitude or expressive quality that you are aiming for.
Graphic Concept: What forms, colors, patterns, open space, organization, etc. might you include? What forms might dominate the visual and formal qualities of your solution?
Response Concept: What response would you like from the users of this space? What would you like them to feel...to be able to do?
Impact Concept: How might you make this space functionally, or expressively powerful? What might really grab the user's attention?

Client description
Write a paragraph that describes the client or business that you are designing this space for.
Describe the people that live/work/create/learn here -- what ages, background, special needs or special interests do they have?
You job is to get to know how these folks are distinctive. Until you have a clear conception of who you are serving, you cannot serve them well -- stereotypes are inadequate and blinding. So, take time to imagine and then describe the people whose needs you meet by designing this space.
(whose needs are you meeting?   Describe the client, their work, their tasks...what activities do they need spaces for? Space planning involves analyzing the functions that must be served by the space.

— Site and Context Description
There might be special aspects of the site or location to consider.
In this project, there are no real-world site constraints, so you can imagine and describe your setting. Is it urban? Rural? Wooded?

Views: 
Provide whatever imagery necessary to introduce us to your concept and your space.
suggested imagery –
a floor plan (does not have to be to accurate scale),
rendering/sketch (1 pt. perspective, isometric, freehand),
elevations of key walls/views,
details of important features or areas.

How to present: 
You’ll pin/tape your work up to the walls, bulletin boards and cabinets in the classroom. You may also use an easel. 
Plan on a brief (verbal) introduction to your concept, and be ready to take questions when we need things explained.

Crit Sheet pdf

During class prepare to: (noon/3pm present)
-- Present full size presentation of your space concept.
-- Include a finished concept statement, a client description, and a list of tasks or activities that this space facilitates.
-- Informally present your concept and statements to the rest of class. Take up to 5 minutes to tell us about your design. Introduce us to how your space solves the needs of your client. Be ready to respond to questions and feedback.

Verbally introduce your concepts.
"Walk us through" the space.
Take questions on your concept.
THEN ask viewers (classmates) — "what is unclear? what is missing? what questions do you have as you look at the presentation?"

Presentations will begin roughly 12 noon and 3pm

Final Day, In Class:  Final Presentation & Crit

Present final concept presentation
Present final 30"x40" board. (with optional model/maquette on board up to 20"x20")

Prepare and present your formal 30"x40" presentation board, graphically communicating your distinct solution.
The board needs to be unified, organized, have appropriate graphic hierarchy from major to minor ideas. Craft it well with no distracting placements or ragged features. Be sure type is readable and consistent.

Note that the first part of class will be spent working in groups, revising and completing your presentations. Work to unify your presentation both conceptually and graphically.
Graphic Unity:
Organize your ideas.

Which are most important? Are they graphically emphatic? How might they be more prominent?
More white-space to isolate them?
Size -- make them bigger?
Color and Contrast — could bolder color or stronger value contrast be used to draw attention?
Borders — could some sort of box or boundary "wrap" and highlight your key content?
Directional Cues — could other forms on the presentation board lead toward this area?
Relief — could other graphics/type on the board be subdued so that this might stand out better?

Your goal is a visual presentation that successfully communicates your concept -- without verbal explanations.
Be sure to include:
a) Client description and activites
b) A concept statement declaring what features or conditions enable this space to nurture creative excellence.
c) Visuals that will orient the viewer, and visually explain your space.
d) Details, materials, samples, notes or other views that will make your specific design concept clear. .

10am Class: 11:30    |    1pm Class: 2:30

Present:
Verbally introduce your concepts.
"Walk us through" the space.
Take questions on your concept.

During class prepare to: (11.45/1.45 present)
-- Present a rough, full size presentation of your space concept. It might include sketches and notes and diagrams quickly taped or pinned in place.
-- Include a finished concept statement, a client description, and a list of tasks or activities that this space facilitates.
-- Informally present your concept and statements to the rest of class. Take up to 3 minutes to tell us about your design. Introduce us to how your space solves the needs of your client. Be ready to respond to questions and feedback.

Verbally introduce your concepts.
"Walk us through" the space.
Take questions on your concept.
THEN ask viewers (classmates) — "what is unclear? what is missing? what questions do you have as you look at the presentation?"

Presentations will begin roughly 11.45 and 1.45.



[GLC: 2DP02 Ideal Workstation.doc ]

Glossary | | Ideal Creative Space ||

                 

Greg Clayton
Design Foundations I
Design Foundations II

Senior Seminar

 
Photography Course
 
Course Schedule
Course Schedule
 
Independent Study
 
            2017 Greg Clayton/ gclayton@harding.edu